Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

More News

Highlights

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Arland Thornton photo

Intergenerational Panel Study of Parents and Children

Publication Abstract

Thornton, Arland, Ronald Freedman, and William Axinn. 2002. "Intergenerational Panel Study of Parents and Children." In Looking at Lives: American Longitudinal Studies of the Twentieth Century edited by Erin Phelps, Frank F Furstenberg and Anne Colby. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Describes a longitudinal study begun in 1962 in Detroit, MI, with a probability sample of 1,304 married white women who had borne a child the previous year. The study became intergenerational in 1980 as these children reached age 18 & were included in data collection. Interviews conducted with mothers & children through 1993 yielded a total of 8 waves of data, which are used to examine fertility preferences & patterns as a function of family characteristics, as well as to compare intergenerational patterns. Though results clearly documented the emergence of a "baby bust" in Detroit at the study's beginnings that replaced the postwar baby boom, in line with the fertility decline occurring in the rest of the US, they were less clear in identifying the determinants of this phenomenon. Changes in the study's goals & protocols over time to take account of larger social changes, eg, increases in the divorce rate & in women's labor force participation, are described, along with adjustments made when the research became intergenerational, eg, a shift in focus to the influence of maternal attitudes & behaviors on those of children. Special methodological issues inherent in the evolution of such long-term panel studies are considered. 56 References. K. Hyatt Stewart.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next