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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Helping Out the Kids: Expectations about Parental Support in Young Adulthood.

Publication Abstract

Goldscheider, F., Arland Thornton, and L.S. Yang. 2001. "Helping Out the Kids: Expectations about Parental Support in Young Adulthood." Journal of Marriage and Family, 63(3): 727-740.

This paper examines the expectations of very young adults (age 18) and their mothers about financial support that parents might provide under a variety of situations common in young adulthood. Using representative data from women and one of their children, we examine differences in expectations between mothers and children and model variation in these expectations. We find that a lower proportion of mothers expect to provide support than their children expect them to, with particularly large gaps between mothers and sons. Further, there are substantial differences in support priorities. Many, mothers would support only, a married child and others only, an unmarried one; similarly,, some mothers would support only, an unmarried child at home, whereas many, others would only, support a child away. Although some of these differences reflect differences in resources, most suggest disagreements and confusion about Americans' family, values.

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