Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Mitchell finds children who lose fathers suffer at cellular level

Seefeldt says hard work alone won't allow poor to reach middle-class status in America

Shaefer says proposed plan to cover tax cuts would hurt a lot of struggling Americans

More News

Highlights

Neal Krause wins GSA's Robert Kleemeier Award

MiCDA Research Fellowship - applications due July 21, 2017

U-M awarded $58 million to develop ideas for preventing and treating health problems

Bailey, Eisenberg , and Fomby promoted at PSC

More Highlights

Implications of Intermittent Employment for Child Labor Estimates

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionLevison, Deborah, Jasper Hoek, David Lam, and Suzanne Duryea. 2003. "Implications of Intermittent Employment for Child Labor Estimates." PSC Research Report No. 03-539. 10 2003.

This paper challenges the common international representation of working children as steady job-holders. We take advantage of panel data (the Pesquisa Mensal de Emprego) from Brazil to follow the employment patterns of large numbers of urban children ages 10-16 during 4 months in their lives. Different waves of the panel cover most of the 1980s and 1990s and include thousands of children, making possible generalizations about large-scale patterns. We document a substantial decline in child employment in the 1990s. An analysis of transition rates in and out of employment for young workers shows relatively high volatility in urban employment, with both higher exit rates and lower entry rates responsible for the decline in child employment. Due to this volatility, however, the proportion of urban Brazilian children ever-working in the labor force is substantially higher than the fraction who are workers at any one point in time; we find that movements in and out of employment are "normal" rather than exceptional. An intermittency multiplier summarizes the difference between employment rates in one reference week vs. four reference weeks over a 4-month period. We conclude that intermittent employment is a crucial characteristic of child labor which must be recognized in order to adequately capture levels of child employment and identify child workers.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next