Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Almirall says comparing SMART designs will increase treatment quality for children with autism

Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Alter says lack of access to administrative data is "big drag on research"


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

John E. Knodel photo

Gender and Aging in the Developing World: Where Are the Men?

Publication Abstract

Knodel, John E., and Mary Beth Ofstedal. 2003. "Gender and Aging in the Developing World: Where Are the Men?" Population and Development Review, 29(4): 677-698.

In recent years, both population aging and gender have become prominent issues in international forums. The discourse related to both topics refers mainly to women, emphasizing their potential disadvantage in old age. It is frequently asserted or implied that older women are universally more vulnerable to social, economic, and health disadvantages than older men. This article argues that a gender-sensitive approach to aging issues should consider the special needs of both sexes and also recognize that gender is not always a compelling marker of disadvantage. It uses data from the developing regions of the world, generally for populations aged 60 and older, to demonstrate that well-being at older ages is multidimensional, that gender differences may favor either sex (or may be largely absent) depending on context and the aspect of well-being that is considered.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next