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Social Structural Influences on Emotional Support From Parents Early in Life and Adult Health Status

Publication Abstract

Shaw, B.A., Neal Krause, L.M. Chatters, C.M. Connell, and Berit Ingersoll-Dayton. 2003. "Social Structural Influences on Emotional Support From Parents Early in Life and Adult Health Status." Behavioral Medicine, 29(2): 68-79.

The authors' purpose in this study was to identify social structural predictors of receiving emotional support from parents early in life and structural factors responsible for variations in the associations between early parental support and adult health status. Data front a US representative sample of 2,786 adults aged 25-74 years suggest that men, non-Whites, and individuals from socioeconomically advantaged families report having received higher levels of early parental support. Furthermore, these analyses suggest that although adult health status is predicted by early parental support in general, health status among adults is particularly,, sensitive to levels of support received from a same-sex parent during childhood. These findings emphasize the pervasive influence of gender in American society, and add focus to researchers' understanding of the long-term health effects of early parental support.

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