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COSSA makes 10 suggestions to next Administration for supporting and using social science research

Thompson says US prison population is 'staggeringly high' at about 1.5 million, despite 2% drop for 2015

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2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

Russell Sage 2-week workshop on social science genomics, June 11-23, 2017, Santa Barbara

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Social Structural Influences on Emotional Support From Parents Early in Life and Adult Health Status

Publication Abstract

Shaw, B.A., Neal Krause, L.M. Chatters, C.M. Connell, and Berit Ingersoll-Dayton. 2003. "Social Structural Influences on Emotional Support From Parents Early in Life and Adult Health Status." Behavioral Medicine, 29(2): 68-79.

The authors' purpose in this study was to identify social structural predictors of receiving emotional support from parents early in life and structural factors responsible for variations in the associations between early parental support and adult health status. Data front a US representative sample of 2,786 adults aged 25-74 years suggest that men, non-Whites, and individuals from socioeconomically advantaged families report having received higher levels of early parental support. Furthermore, these analyses suggest that although adult health status is predicted by early parental support in general, health status among adults is particularly,, sensitive to levels of support received from a same-sex parent during childhood. These findings emphasize the pervasive influence of gender in American society, and add focus to researchers' understanding of the long-term health effects of early parental support.

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