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Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Obesity and Weight Gain Are Associated With Increased Incidence of Hyperinsulinemia in Non-Diabetic Men

Publication Abstract

Lakka, H.M., J.T. Salonen, J. Toumilehto, George A. Kaplan, and T.A. Lakka. 2002. "Obesity and Weight Gain Are Associated With Increased Incidence of Hyperinsulinemia in Non-Diabetic Men." Hormone and Metabolic Research, 34(9): 492-498.

We investigated the temporal relationships between obesity, weight change and hyperinsulinemia in a population-based 4-year follow-up study of 695 middle-aged, non-diabetic, and normoinsulinemic men. Thirty-eight men developed hyperinsulinemia during the follow-up (fasting serum insulin greater than or equal to12.0 mU/l). In logistic regression analysis adjusting for other risk factors, men with body mass index of greater than or equal to 26.7 kg/m(2) (highest third) had a 6.6-fold (p = 0.001) risk of developing hyperinsulinemia, compared with men with body mass index of < 24.4 kg/m(2) (lowest third). Correspondingly, men with waist-to-hip ratio of greater than or equal to 0.95 (highest third) had a 3.5-fold (p = 0.028) incidence of hyperinsulinemia compared with men with waist-to-hip ratio of < 0.90 (lowest third). Weight gain in middle age and weight gain from the age of 20 years to middle age were also associated with increased risk of hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia at baseline was not associated with weight gain during the follow-up. This prospective population-based study emphasizes the importance of avoiding obesity and weight gain during adulthood in preventing hyperinsulinemia.

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