Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Inglehart says European social democracy is a victim of its own success

Bound, Khanna, and Morales find multiple effects of H1-B visas on US tech industry

Prescott says public criminal registries have downside

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Bancroft Prize for History for 'Blood in the Water'

Michigan ranks in USN&WR top-10 grad schools for sociology, public health, labor economics, social policy, social psychology

Paula Lantz to speak at Women in Health Leadership Summit, March 24, 2:30-5:30 Michigan League

New site highlights research, data, and publications of Relationship Dynamics and Social Life study

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 20, 2017, noon:
Dean Yang, Taken by Storm

Ferrets as a Transmission Model for Influenza: Sequence Changes in Ha1 of Type a (H3n2) Virus

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Herlocher, M.L., S. Elias, R. Truscon, S. Harrison, D. Mindell, Carl P. Simon, and A.S. Monto. 2001. "Ferrets as a Transmission Model for Influenza: Sequence Changes in Ha1 of Type a (H3n2) Virus." Journal of Infectious Diseases, 184(5): 542-546.

Ferrets were used as an animal model to study whether controlled transmission of type A influenza is similar to human transmission when sequence changes in HA1 are used as the outcome. Ferrets were infected initially with A/Sydney/5/97 (H3N2) or A/LA/1/87 (H3N2) intranasally, and transmission chains were established by housing infected ferrets with noninfected ferrets with no influenza antibody titer against the infecting virus. Ferrets infected with A/Sydney were seronegative for A/Sydney and A/LA; ferrets infected with A/LA were seronegative for A/LA but had hemagglutination inhibition titers against A/Sydney. Titers of naturally transmitted influenza were higher than those after direct intranasal infection, but lymphocyte counts from nasal washes diminished with transmission. Ferrets infected with A/LA had 2 amino acid differences in HA1 after transmission through 5 ferret cohorts, but those infected with A/Sydney had none. The results show the value of the ferret model. A/LA resembled the transmission of influenza in humans when under antibody pressure.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next