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Daniel Eisenberg, "Healthy Minds Network: Mental Health among College-Age Populations"

Education and Stratification in Developing Countries: a Review of Theories and Research

Publication Abstract

Buchmann, C., and Emily Hannum. 2001. "Education and Stratification in Developing Countries: a Review of Theories and Research." Annual Review of Sociology, 27: 77-102.

This review examines research on education and inequality in developing regions. In tracing the progress of this field of inquiry, it focuses on empirical studies of educational inequality in four broad areas: macro-structural forces shaping education and stratification; the relationship between family background and educational outcomes; school effects; and education's impact on economic and social mobility. It assesses the contributions of research in Africa, Asia, and Latin America to the general study of education and social stratification and the theoretical leverage gained from examining stratification processes in developing regions of the world. Finally, the review discusses recent developments that hold promise for addressing the knowledge gaps that remain; these include utilizing relatively new data sources and methods in comparative, cross-national studies and greater collaboration between researchers who study strikingly similar questions but remain segregated due to their focus on either industrialized or developing societies.

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