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Geronimus says black-white differences in mortality "help silence black voices in the electorate"

Do universities need more conservative thinkers?

Starr critical of risk assessment scores for sentencing

Highlights

Presentation on multilevel modeling using Stata, July 26th, noon, 6050 ISR

Frey's new report explores how the changing US electorate could shape the next 5 presidential elections, 2016 to 2032

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Kenneth M. Sylvester photo

Household Composition and Canada's Rural Capitalism: The Extent of Rural Labor Markets in 1901

Publication Abstract

Sylvester, Kenneth M. 2001. "Household Composition and Canada's Rural Capitalism: The Extent of Rural Labor Markets in 1901." Journal of Family History, 26(9): 289-309.

The impact of family structure on waged employment is examined using data from the national sample of the 1901 census. The findings suggest that historical inflexibility in the supply of rural labor stemmed from the demands farm parents placed on work-age children. The pervasiveness of family proprietorship in agriculture worked to keep a majority of work-age Canadians outside of waged employment in 1901. Even in the country's western interior, where farms were much larger, individuals who lived in married-couple households on farms were the least likely to report themselves in the census as employees.

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