Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Thompson casts doubt on the rehabilitative intentions of prison labor

Inglehart says European social democracy is a victim of its own success

Bound, Khanna, and Morales find multiple effects of H1-B visas on US tech industry

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Bancroft Prize for History for 'Blood in the Water'

Michigan ranks in USN&WR top-10 grad schools for sociology, public health, labor economics, social policy, social psychology

Paula Lantz to speak at Women in Health Leadership Summit, March 24, 2:30-5:30 Michigan League

New site highlights research, data, and publications of Relationship Dynamics and Social Life study

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 20, 2017, noon:
Dean Yang, Taken by Storm

Paula M. Lantz photo

A Disease-Specific Medicaid Expansion for Women: the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000

Publication Abstract

Lantz, Paula M., C.S. Weisman, and Z. Itani. 2003. "A Disease-Specific Medicaid Expansion for Women: the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000." Women's Health Issues, 13(3): 79-92.

The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000 (BCCPTA) allows states the option of extending Medicaid eligibility to women diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer through a large federal screening program that does not include resources for treatment. Using qualitative data from interviews with 22 key informants and other sources, we present an analysis of the history and passage of the BCCPTA as a policy response to a perceived "treatment gap" in a national screening program. The results suggest that organizational policy entrepreneurs-primarily the National Breast Cancer Coalition-constructed an effective problem definition (that the government screening program was "unethical" and "broken") with a viable policy solution (an optional disease-specific Medicaid expansion), and pushed this proposal through a policy window opened by a budget surplus and an election year in which women's health issues had broad bipartisan appeal.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next