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Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

Stafford says less educated, smaller investors more likely to sell off stock and lock in losses during market downturn

Chen says job fit, job happiness can be achieved over time

Highlights

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

A Disease-Specific Medicaid Expansion for Women: the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Lantz, Paula M., C.S. Weisman, and Z. Itani. 2003. "A Disease-Specific Medicaid Expansion for Women: the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000." Womens Health Issues, 13(3): 79-92.

The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000 (BCCPTA) allows states the option of extending Medicaid eligibility to women diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer through a large federal screening program that does not include resources for treatment. Using qualitative data from interviews with 22 key informants and other sources, we present an analysis of the history and passage of the BCCPTA as a policy response to a perceived "treatment gap" in a national screening program. The results suggest that organizational policy entrepreneurs-primarily the National Breast Cancer Coalition-constructed an effective problem definition (that the government screening program was "unethical" and "broken") with a viable policy solution (an optional disease-specific Medicaid expansion), and pushed this proposal through a policy window opened by a budget surplus and an election year in which women's health issues had broad bipartisan appeal.

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