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Frey and colleagues outline 10 trends showing scale of America's demographic transitions

Starr says surveys intended to predict recidivism assign higher risk to poor

Prescott and colleagues find incidence of noncompetes in U.S. labor force varies by job, state, worker education

Highlights

PAA 2015 Annual Meeting: Preliminary program and list of UM participants

ISR addition wins LEED Gold Certification

PSC Fall 2014 Newsletter now available

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 9
Luigi Pistaferri, Consumption Inequality and Family Labor Supply

A Disease-Specific Medicaid Expansion for Women: the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Lantz, Paula M., C.S. Weisman, and Z. Itani. 2003. "A Disease-Specific Medicaid Expansion for Women: the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000." Womens Health Issues, 13(3): 79-92.

The Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act of 2000 (BCCPTA) allows states the option of extending Medicaid eligibility to women diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer through a large federal screening program that does not include resources for treatment. Using qualitative data from interviews with 22 key informants and other sources, we present an analysis of the history and passage of the BCCPTA as a policy response to a perceived "treatment gap" in a national screening program. The results suggest that organizational policy entrepreneurs-primarily the National Breast Cancer Coalition-constructed an effective problem definition (that the government screening program was "unethical" and "broken") with a viable policy solution (an optional disease-specific Medicaid expansion), and pushed this proposal through a policy window opened by a budget surplus and an election year in which women's health issues had broad bipartisan appeal.

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