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Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Reynolds Farley photo

The 1960's: A Decade of Progress for Blacks?

Publication Abstract

Farley, Reynolds, and Albert Hermalin. 1972. "The 1960's: A Decade of Progress for Blacks?" Demography, 9(3): 353-70.

Between 1960 and 1970 blacks, as well as whites, improved their socioeconomic status. Among both races, educational attainment increased, the occupational distribution was upgraded, and real purchasing power rose markedly. In almost every comparison, the gains were somewhat greater among blacks than among whites and thus most indicators of racial differentiation declined. Nevertheless, the changes of this decade failed to eliminate racial differences with regard to socioeconomic status. In all comparisons, except for the income of certain groups of women, blacks were at a disadvantage when compared to whites both at the start and at the end of this decade, and very large racial differences remain. Further socioeconomic progress by blacks during the 1970s will probably not eliminate racial differences. The article concludes by relating the socioeconomic trends to such other aspects of race relations as integration, governmental policy, and the attitudes of whites and blacks.

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