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Bailey and Dynarski's work cited in Bloomberg article on growing U.S. inequality

Frey says current minority college completion rates predict decline in college-educated Americans

Kimball and unnamed coauthor examine male bias in economics

Highlights

Call for Proposals: Small Grants for Research Using PSID Data. Due March 2, 2015

PSC Fall 2014 Newsletter now available

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Michigan's graduate sociology program tied for 4th with Stanford in USN&WR rankings

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Jan 26
Jeff Smith, Consequences of Student-College Mismatch

Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms Among Middle-Aged Women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (Swan)

Publication Abstract

Bromberger, J.T., Sioban D. Harlow, N. Avis, H.M. Kravitz, and A. Cordal. 2004. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms Among Middle-Aged Women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (Swan)." American Journal of Public Health, 94(8): 1378-1385.

Objectives. We examined racial/ethnic differences in significant depressive symptoms among middle-aged women before and after adjustment for socioeconomic, health-related, and psychosocial characteristics. Methods. Racial/ethnic differences in unadjusted and adjusted prevalence of significant depressive symptoms (score 16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression [CES-D] Scale) were assessed with univariate and multiple logistic regressions. Results. Twenty-four percent of the sample had a CES-D score of 16 or higher. Unadjusted prevalence varied by race/ethnicity (P < .0001). After adjustment for covariates, racial/ethnic differences overall were no longer significant. Conclusions. Hispanic and African American women had the highest odds, and Chinese and Japanese women had the lowest odds, for a CES-D score of 16 or higher. This variation is in part because of health-related and psychosocial factors that are linked to socioeconomic status.

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