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Addressing Urban Health in Detroit, New York City, and Seattle Through Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Metzler, M.M., D.L. Higgins, C.G. Beeker, N. Freudenberg, Paula M. Lantz, K.D. Senturia, A.A. Eisinger, and E.A. Viruell-Fuentes. 2003. "Addressing Urban Health in Detroit, New York City, and Seattle Through Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships." American Journal of Public Health, 93(5): 803-811.

Objective. This study describes key activities integral to the development of 3 community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships. Methods. We compared findings from individual case studies conducted at 3 urban research centers (URCs) to identify crosscutting adaptations of a CBPR approach in the first 4 years of the partnerships' development. Results. Activities critical in partnership development include sharing decision-making, defining principles of collaboration, establishing research priorities, and securing funding. Intermediate outcomes were sustained CBPR partnerships, trust within the partnerships, public health research programs, and increased capacity to conduct CBPR. Challenges included the time needed for meaningful collaboration, concerns regarding sustainable funding, and issues related to institutional racism. Conclusions. The URC experiences suggest that CBPR can be successfully implemented in diverse settings.

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