Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stephenson assessing in-home HIV testing and counseling for male couples

Thompson says mass incarceration causes collapse of Detroit neighborhoods

Liberal-conservative gap by education level growing in U.S.

Highlights

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

AAUP reports on faculty compensation by category, affiliation, and academic rank

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Risk Factors for Low Bone Mineral Density and the 6-Year Rate of Bone Loss Among Premenopausal and Perimenopausal Women

Publication Abstract

Bainbridge, K.E., M. Sowers, X.H. Lin, and Sioban D. Harlow. 2004. "Risk Factors for Low Bone Mineral Density and the 6-Year Rate of Bone Loss Among Premenopausal and Perimenopausal Women." Osteoporosis International, 15(6): 439-446.

Risk factors that are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) may not necessarily be associated with increased bone loss among premenopausal and perimenopausal women. We determined risk factors for lower premenopausal and perimenopausal BMD while simultaneously determining risk factors for increased 6-year rate of bone loss among women aged 24-50 years within a population-based prospective cohort study. BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck, reported as t scores, were measured five times within the 6-year study among 614 women who were between the ages of 24 and 44 in 1992/1993. Rates of bone loss were calculated from the repeated BMD measurements. Risk factors for lower BMD over time at the lumbar spine included history of any fracture (P=0.005). The major risk factor for lower BMD over time at the femoral neck was family history of osteoporosis (P<0.002). The major protective factor for greater BMD over time at both skeletal sites was additional body weight (P<0.0001). Other protective factors for greater BMD over time at the femoral neck were modest alcohol consumption (P=0.0002) and high-school sports participation (P=0.002). Risk factors for greater bone loss at either skeletal site included postmenopausal status (P<0.0001 at the lumbar spine; P=0.01 at the femoral neck), and the reporting of a reproductive cancer (P<0.0001 at the lumbar spine; P=0.0008 at the femoral neck). Body weight was protective against bone loss at both skeletal sites (P<0.0001). Baseline age, calcium intake, smoking, and current physical activity were not associated with BMD or bone loss. The understanding of the relative importance of risk factors for both low BMD and bone loss may assist in the identification of women at greater risk for subsequent low postmenopausal BMD.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next