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Smock discusses the "new American family" on NPR

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Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

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Next Brown Bag

Monday, Dec 1
Linda Waite, Health & Well-Being of Adults over 60

Adolescent Well-Being in Cohabiting, Married, and Single-Parent Families

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Manning, Wendy, and K.A. Lamb. 2003. "Adolescent Well-Being in Cohabiting, Married, and Single-Parent Families." Journal of Marriage and the Family, 65(4): 876-893.

Cohabitation is a family,form that increasingly includes children. We use the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to assess the well-being of adolescents in cohabiting parent stepfamilies (N = 13,231). Teens living with cohabiting stepparents often fare worse than teens living with two biological married parents. Adolescents living in cohabiting stepfamilies experience greater disadvantage than teens living in married stepfamilies. Most of these differences, however, are explained by socioeconomic circumstances. Teenagers living with single unmarried mothers are similar to teens living with cohabiting stepparents; exceptions include greater delinquency and lower grade point averages experienced by teens living with cohabiting stepparents. Yet mother's marital history explains these differences. Our results contribute to our understanding of cohabitation and debates about the importance of marriage for children.

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