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Sastry's 10-year study of New Orleans Katrina evacuees shows demographic differences between returning and nonreturning

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Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12
Joe Grengs, Policy & Planning for Social Equity in Transportation

Estimating Series of Vital Rates and Age Structures from Baptisms and Burials: A New Technique with Applications to Preindustrial England

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Lee, R. "Estimating Series of Vital Rates and Age Structures from Baptisms and Burials: A New Technique with Applications to Preindustrial England." Population Studies, 28, no. 3 (1974): 495-512.

This paper presents a technique for deriving demographic information from long aggregate time series of baptisms and burials. Specifically, this technique provides quinquennial estimates of population size, age structure, life expectancy and gross reproduction rates. It assumes that age-specific fertility and mortality schedules belong to one-parameter families, and that the effects of net migration and under-registration cancel. It complements reconstitution analysis by providing temporal detail, and by testing the consistency of estimated vital rates with the aggregate series. It is preferable to stable population analysis for many historical applications since it does not assume stability. The method is applied to Colyton data, 1545 to 1834, confirming Wrigley's results and adding some new detail. The method is also applied to Brownlee's version of Rickman's data for England, 1701 to 1840.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/2173642

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