Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Elliott co-PI on new study examining how early environment impacts children's health

Levy says ACA has helped increase rates of insured, but rates still lowest among poor

Bruch reveals key decision criteria in making first cuts on dating sites

More News

Highlights

U-M ranked #4 in USN&WR's top public universities

Frey's new report explores how the changing US electorate could shape the next 5 presidential elections, 2016 to 2032

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Oct 3 at noon:
Longevity, Education, & Income, Hoyt Bleakley

Estimating Series of Vital Rates and Age Structures from Baptisms and Burials: A New Technique with Applications to Preindustrial England

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Lee, R. "Estimating Series of Vital Rates and Age Structures from Baptisms and Burials: A New Technique with Applications to Preindustrial England." Population Studies, 28, no. 3 (1974): 495-512.

This paper presents a technique for deriving demographic information from long aggregate time series of baptisms and burials. Specifically, this technique provides quinquennial estimates of population size, age structure, life expectancy and gross reproduction rates. It assumes that age-specific fertility and mortality schedules belong to one-parameter families, and that the effects of net migration and under-registration cancel. It complements reconstitution analysis by providing temporal detail, and by testing the consistency of estimated vital rates with the aggregate series. It is preferable to stable population analysis for many historical applications since it does not assume stability. The method is applied to Colyton data, 1545 to 1834, confirming Wrigley's results and adding some new detail. The method is also applied to Brownlee's version of Rickman's data for England, 1701 to 1840.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/2173642

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next