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Burgard and Seelye find job insecurity linked to psychological distress among workers in later years

Former PSC trainee Jay Borchert parlays past incarceration and doctoral degree into pursuing better treatment of inmates

Inglehart says shaky job market for millennials has contributed to their disaffection

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Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

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PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of "Broken Windows"

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Sampson, Robert J., and Stephen W. Raudenbush. 2004. "Seeing Disorder: Neighborhood Stigma and the Social Construction of "Broken Windows"." Social Psychology Quarterly, 67(4): 319-342.

This article reveals the grounds on which individuals form perceptions of disorder. Integrating ideas about implicit bias and statistical discrimination with a theoretical framework on neighborhood racial stigma, our empirical test brings together personal interviews, census data, police records, and systematic social observations situated within some 500 block groups in Chicago. Observed disorder predicts perceived disorder, but racial and economic context matter more. As the concentration of minority groups and poverty increases, residents of all races perceive heightened disorder even after we account for an extensive army of personal characteristics and independently observed neighborhood conditions. Seeing disorder appears to be imbued with social meanings that go well beyond what essentialist theories imply, generating self-reinforcing processes that may help account for the perpetuation of urban racial inequality.

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