Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Elisha Renne photo

Postinor use among young women in Southwestern Nigeria: A Research Note

Publication Abstract

Renne, Elisha. 1998. "Postinor use among young women in Southwestern Nigeria: A Research Note." Reproductive Health Matters, 6(11): 107-114.

Postinor is the brand name of a progestogen-only contraceptive tablet, manufactured by a Hungarian firm1 and available in about 25 countries around the world, primarily in parts of Eastern Europe and several developing countries, including Vietnam2 Thailand3 and Nigeria.4 Although Postinor is marketed in Nigeria as a postcoital method for women having infrequent intercourse, it has not been shown to be safe or effective for this indication.5,6 This paper reports on the experience of 26 young women with post-secondary education in south western Nigeria who have used Postinor, how they heard about it, what they know about it and where they buy it. While these young women are primarily using Postinor as a postcoital method, some also are using it to test for pregnancy, to bring on menstruation and in attempts to abort or all of these as needed. It has been proposed that Postinorshould bemarketed asanemergency contraceptive, the only indication for which it has been shown to be effective, but its uses in Nigeria may not change unless the reasons why women use it are addressed.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next