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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Dirgha Ghimire photo

Social change, premarital nonfamily experience, and spouse choice in an arranged marriage society

Publication Abstract

Ghimire, Dirgha, William Axinn, Scott T. Yabiku, and Arland Thornton. 2006. "Social change, premarital nonfamily experience, and spouse choice in an arranged marriage society." American Journal of Sociology, 111(4): 1181-1218.

This article examines the influences of nonfamily experiences on participation in the selection of a first spouse in an arranged marriage society. The authors developed a theoretical framework to explain how a broad array of nonfamily experiences may translate into greater participation in the choice of a spouse. Analyses show that premarital nonfamily experiences, in general, and media exposure and participation in youth clubs, in particular, have strong positive effects on individual participation in the choice of a spouse. These findings suggest new ways of thinking about the relationship between social change and the transition away from arranged marriage. Overall, changes in these nonfamily experiences can account for a substantial fraction of the historical increase of youth involvement in mate selection.

DOI:10.1086/498468 (Full Text)

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