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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

William H. Frey photo

Brain Gains/Brain Drains

Publication Abstract

Frey, William H. 2004. "Brain Gains/Brain Drains." American Demographics, 26(5): 19-23.

Nearly a quarter of American adults have a college education - a record high. As education remains a strong priority for parents and their children, it's also a number 1 goal for governors and mayors who see attracting the best and the brightest to their states and cities as essential to enriching their tax bases and staying competitive. Fact is, competition among places for smart migrants - recent college grads, midcareer workers or retirees - creates winners and losers. Recently released migration data from the 2000 census show some surprises. Some of the most cosmopolitan, gray matter-rich sections of the country appear to be losing their grip. Elite coastal states still have the edge as bastions of the educated. Noticeably absent from this elite list are most of the states in the interior West and South. Atlanta drew the largest number of college graduates of all 48 major metropolitan areas in the country.

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