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Immigration and Domestic Migration in US Metro Areas: 2000 and 1990 Census Findings by Education and Race

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionFrey, William H. 2005. "Immigration and Domestic Migration in US Metro Areas: 2000 and 1990 Census Findings by Education and Race." PSC Research Report No. 05-572. April 2005.

This report compares 2000 census metropolitan migration data for the 1995-2000 period with 1990 census data for 1985-90 to detect changes from the earlier patterns. The findings show that while the earlier, signature migration dynamics of the three types of metropolitan areas tend to persist, significant changes are emerging First, while “High Immigration areas” continue to sustain net domestic out migration, this low skilled “flight” is no longer dominated by whites, but includes substantial numbers of Hispanics and Asians, both foreign and native born. Second, although “High Domestic migration” areas continue to attract well educated whites and blacks, they are also attracting large numbers of primarily low skilled immigrant minorities both as domestic migrants and immigrants. Third, while “High Out-migration” areas continue to sustain “brain drains” of domestic migrants, they are now being compensated by immigrant flows, with higher average educational attainments than the immigrant flows going to other metropolitan area types. Thus, although each type of metropolitan area is developing distinct race-ethnic profiles, the continued dispersion of immigrant minorities is affecting the population profiles of all three types of areas.

Country of focus: United States of America.

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