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Functional Impairment as a Risk Factor for Urinary Incontinence Among Older Americans

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Jenkins, Kristi R., and N.A. Fultz. 2005. "Functional Impairment as a Risk Factor for Urinary Incontinence Among Older Americans." Neurourology & Urodynamics, 24(1): 51-55.

Aims: Using a large nationally representative sample of older Americans we investigate four domains of functional impairment as possible risk factors for the subsequent development of urinary incontinence (UI) symptoms. Methods: Data from three waves (1993, 1995, 1998) of the Asset and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) survey were used to model the effects of functional impairment on the onset of UI symptoms. Results: A greater number of serious chronic conditions and functional impairment in the lower body mobility domain increased the odds of the onset of mild UI (vs. remaining continent). Factors that contributed to greater odds of the onset of severe UT (vs. remaining continent) were older age, being represented by a proxy respondent, and functional impairment in the strength domain. Conclusions: Understanding the possible relationship between functional impairment and UI is an important step toward developing appropriate interventions for the prevention, treatment, or management of urine loss

DOI:10.1002/nau.20089 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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