Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Thompson says criminal justice policies led to creation of prison gangs like Aryan Brotherhood

Schmitz finds job loss before retirement age contributes to weight gain, especially in men

Kimball says Fed should get comfortable with "backtracking"

Highlights

Overview of Michigan's advanced research computing resources, Monday, June 27, 9-10:30 am, BSRB - Kahn Auditorium

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

The Economic Consequences of the Dissolution of Cohabiting Unions

Publication Abstract

Avellar, Sarah, and Pamela Smock. 2005. "The Economic Consequences of the Dissolution of Cohabiting Unions." Journal of Marriage and Family, 67(2): 315-327.

Although the economic effects of divorce have been well studied, a similar exploration of cohabitation has not been conducted. For this analysis, we use a sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,372) documenting changes in economic well-being at the end of a cohabiting relationship and comparing these results to a sample of divorced respondents. After dissolution, formerly cohabiting men's economic standing declines moderately, whereas formerly cohabiting women's declines much more precipitously, leaving a substantial proportion of women in poverty. This effect is particularly pronounced for African American and Hispanic women. Though the end of the relationship does reinforce gender stratification, it is also an "equalizer" between married and cohabiting women, leaving them in strikingly similar economic positions.

DOI:10.1111/j.0022-2445.2005.00118.x (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next