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Burgard and Seelye find job insecurity linked to psychological distress among workers in later years

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

The Measurement of Commitment to Work

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Coombs, Lolagene C. "The Measurement of Commitment to Work." Journal of Population, 2, no. 3 (Fall 1979): 203-23.

A methodological study using conjoint measurement analysis to determine whether there is an appropriate model for measuring commitment to work in the job-family trade-off context was conducted with 213 University of Michigan students and staff as subjects. The results indicate that there are two important dimensions that can be measured: a preference for a level of involvement in the total workchild domain and a preference for a job vs. child orientation. Based on the unfolding theory of preferential choice, a scale for each dimension was developed. The Total Involvement Level Scale places respondents on a continuum from a preference for least (I L 1 ) to most (I L 7) involvement; the Job vs. Child Orientation Scale ranges from greatest job orientation or commitment (JC 1) to greatest child orientation (JC 7). A field test has indicated the feasibility of the scales for use in em pi rical research, and protocols for easy use in large surveys are presented.

DOI:10.1007/BF00972537 (Full Text)

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