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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Reducing Disparities in Vaccination Rates Between Different Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Groups: The Potential of Community-Based Multilevel Interventions

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Galea, Sandro, S. Sisco, and D. Vlahov. 2005. "Reducing Disparities in Vaccination Rates Between Different Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Groups: The Potential of Community-Based Multilevel Interventions." Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, 28(1): 49-59.

There are well-documented disparities in vaccination rates between different socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups in the United States. These disparities persist in spite of an overall increase in vaccination rates during the last decade and the implementation of several interventions that have aimed to increase vaccination rates in disadvantaged groups. Although many interventions are efficacious at improving vaccination rates under trial conditions, these interventions when extended to the general population frequently do not appreciably improve its health. Explanations for this limited intervention efficiency include poor adherence to protocols in real life versus idealized trial situations, changes in baseline so that the trial conditions are no longer replicable, and the contribution of other community-level factors that make it difficult to extend the trial methods to other communities. Multilevel community intervention trials recognize and address the multiple competing forces that shape the health of the population in cities and have the potential to increase vaccination rates among minorities and marginalized groups.

Country of focus: United States of America.

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