Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stephenson says homophobia among gay men raises risk of intimate partner violence

Frey says having more immigrants with higher birth rates fills need in the US

Inglehart's work on the rise of populism cited in NYT

More News

Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Risk factors for prematurity at Harare Maternity Hospital, Zimbabwe

Publication Abstract

Feresu, S.A., Sioban D. Harlow, and G.B. Woelk. 2004. "Risk factors for prematurity at Harare Maternity Hospital, Zimbabwe." International Journal of Epidemiology, 33(6): 1194-1201.

Background Prematurity remains the main cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and a problem in the care of pregnant women world-wide. This preliminary study describes the socio-demographic, reproductive, medical, and obstetrical risk factors for having a live pre-term delivery (PTD) in Zimbabwe. Methods This case-control study examined risk factors for PTD, at Harare Maternity Hospital between March and June 1999.

Results The frequency of PTD among live birth was 16.4%. Prior history of stillbirth or abortion was associated with PTD (adjusted relative risk [ARR] 1.50; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.11). Nutritional factors, including drinking a local non-alcoholic beverage (mahewu) during pregnancy and mother's increasing mid-arm circumference reduced the risk of PTD (ARR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.93 and ARR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.92, 0.99 per cm of circumference, respectively). Obstetric conditions including eclampsia, anaemia, ante-partum haemorrhage, and placenta praevia were infrequent, but when present, were strongly associated with PTD (ARR = 3.57; 95% CI: 1.67, 7.63; ARR = 4.12; 95% CI: 1.80, 9.43; ARR = 3.05; 95% CI: 1.86, 5.00 and ARR = 3.30; 95% CI: 1.34, 8.14, respectively). Malaria, although less frequent, nonetheless was associated with an increased risk of PTD (ARR = 2.93; 95% CI: 1.70, 5.04). These results suggest that in addition to established obstetric risk factors, nutrition and malarial infection are important. About 43% of the mothers initiated prenatal care after 28 weeks of gestation.

Conclusion Addressing prematurity in this population will require earlier initiation of prenatal care to allow for early detection and management of complications of pregnancy, and improving nutritional status of reproductive age with locally available foods. Further exploration of the potential benefits of mahewu, is warranted.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next