Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Seefeldt says 'consumption smoothing' behavior makes long-term recovery more difficult for economically vulnerable

Seefeldt criticizes Kansas legislation restricting daily cash withdrawals from public assistance funds

Prescott says sex offender registries may increase recidivism by making offender re-assimilation impossible

Highlights

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Spring 2015 PSC newletter available now

Formal demography workshop and conference at UC Berkeley, August 17-21

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Physical activity and mortality across cardiovascular disease risk groups

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Richardson, C.R., A.M. Kriska, Paula M. Lantz, and R.A. Hayward. 2004. "Physical activity and mortality across cardiovascular disease risk groups." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(11): 1923-1929.

Purpose: Several cohort studies suggest that sedentary individuals have an increased risk of death compared with individuals who are physically active. Most of these studies have been conducted in highly selected patient populations who tend to be healthier and are from higher socioeconomic status (SES) groups. We examined the impact of a sedentary lifestyle on mortality by cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk group in a national sample of U.S. adults who represent a wide range of activity levels, health conditions, and SES groups. Methods: Using data from the HRS, a nationally representative, observational study of 9824 U.S. adults aged 51-61 yr in 1992, we estimated the relative risk of death comparing sedentary individuals with those who are physically active by CVD risk group in a multivariate logistic regression model. Results: Even after adjusting for confounders, regular moderate to vigorous physical activity was associated with substantially lower overall mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.62 (95% CI 0.44-0.86)) compared with sedentary individuals. High CVD risk individuals (21% of the population) accounted for 64% of deaths attributable to a sedentary lifestyle. Those with high CVD risk had the most significant benefit from being active (regular moderate to vigorous exercisers OR = 0.55 (95% CI 0.31-0.97) and occasional or light exercisers OR 0.55 (95% CI 0.41-0.74)) compared with high CVD risk individuals who were sedentary. Conclusion: A sedentary lifestyle is associated with a higher risk of death in preretirement-aged U.S. adults. Individuals with high CVD risk appear to get the largest benefit from being physically active. Physical activity interventions targeting high CVD risk individuals should be a medical and public health priority.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next