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Mon, April 6
Jinkook Lee, Wellbeing of the Elderly in East Asia

The role of HIV-related knowledge and ethnicity in determining HIV risk perception and willingness to undergo HIV testing among rural women in Burkina Faso

Publication Abstract

Sarker, M., A. Milkowski, T. Slanger, A. Gondos, A. Sanou, B. Kouyate, and Rachel C. Snow. 2005. "The role of HIV-related knowledge and ethnicity in determining HIV risk perception and willingness to undergo HIV testing among rural women in Burkina Faso." AIDS and Behavior, 9(2): 243-249.

We conducted a random community based survey of 300 young (15-29 years) rural women in Nouna, Burkina Faso. Only one-third of women were aware that a person could have HIV without having symptoms and these women were significantly more likely to classify themselves to be at high risk for getting HIV. Furthermore, multiple partners, Bwaba ethnicity and having mentioned a health worker as a source of HIV information were significantly associated with perceived high personal risk. Perceived willingness to participate in VCT was high (69%). The dissemination of information on the asymptomatic nature of HIV infection could potentially be very important in forming risk perception, awareness, and their willingness to participate in HIV interventions.

DOI:10.1007/s10461-005-3905-z (Full Text)

Country of focus: Burkina Faso.

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