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Intergenerational transfers of resources between older persons and extended kin in Taiwan and the Philippines

Publication Abstract

Agree, Emily M., Ann E. Biddlecom, and T.W. Valente. 2005. "Intergenerational transfers of resources between older persons and extended kin in Taiwan and the Philippines." Population Studies, 59(2): 181-195.

This study examines the extent to which older generations actively exchange resources with extended kin in Taiwan and the Philippines. It is critical to understand the position of older generations in the family, because population ageing and declines in family size spur concerns about the tenacity of family support. This research builds upon previous studies that have predominantly focused on parent-child relationships alone or on support received by older parents. Social-network measures are used to estimate overall levels of transfers of resources across generations, and the prevalence and patterns of pathways that link generations and types of kin. Our findings show that the availability of kin is similar in both settings but that transfer activity in the Philippines appears more broadly distributed across family relations, especially siblings, while in Taiwan transfers are more concentrated among lineal kin. These results confirm the importance and diversity of extended kin in systems of family support.

DOI:10.1080/00324720500099454 (Full Text)

Countries of focus: Philippines, Taiwan.

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