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Cultivated land changes and their driving forces: A satellite remote sensing analysis in the Yellow River Delta, China

Publication Abstract

Zhang, G.X., Ge Lin, J.J. Fletcher, and C. Yuill. 2004. "Cultivated land changes and their driving forces: A satellite remote sensing analysis in the Yellow River Delta, China." Pedosphere, 14(1): 93-102.

Taking Kenli County in the Yellow River Delta, China, as the study area and using digital satellite remote sensing techniques, cultivated land use changes and their corresponding driving forces were explored in this study. An interactive interpretation and a manual modification procedure were carried out to acquire cultivated land information. An overlay method based on classification results and a visual change detection method which was supported by land use maps were employed to detect the cultivated land changes. Based on the changes that were revealed and a spatial analysis between cultivated land use and related natural and socio-economic factors, the driving forces for cultivated land use changes in the study area were determined. The results showed a decrease in cultivated land in Kenli County of 5 321.8 ha from 1987 to 1998, i.e., an average annual decrement of 483.8 ha, which occurred mainly in the central paddy field region and the northeast dry land region. Adverse human activities, soil salinization and water deficiencies were the driving forces that caused these cultivated land use changes.

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