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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Socioeconomic Status and Age: The Effect of Income Sources and Portfolios on U.S. Adult Mortality

Publication Abstract

Krueger, P.M., R.G. Rogers, Robert A. Hummer, Felicia B. LeClere, and Stephanie A. Bond Huie. 2003. "Socioeconomic Status and Age: The Effect of Income Sources and Portfolios on U.S. Adult Mortality." Sociological Forum, 18:465-482.

Despite the persistent inverse relationship between family income & mortality, no one has examined the effect of distinct income sources or income portfolios on mortality risk. We link the National Health Interview Survey to the Multiple Cause of Death file & use hazard models to examine income-related mortality across four age groups. Income from jobs, self-employment, interest, & dividends each predicts lower mortality at the younger, middle, & early old ages. Diverse income portfolios buffer against mortality risk at all ages, net of the amount of income received. These findings illuminate the various dimensions of income that shape US mortality risks.

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