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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

The Relationship Between the Trajectory of Body Mass Index and Health Trajectory Among Older Adults - Multilevel Modeling Analyses

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Kahng, S.K., R.E. Dunkle, and James S. Jackson. 2004. "The Relationship Between the Trajectory of Body Mass Index and Health Trajectory Among Older Adults - Multilevel Modeling Analyses." Research on Aging, 26:31-61.

Little is known about the cross-sectional or longitudinal relationships between body weight and health at older ages. Using multilevel modeling analyses, this study examined the trajectories of body mass index (BMI), chronic health conditions (CHC), and functional disability (FD); factors associated with the trajectories; and the relationships between the trajectories. The sample of elders aged 65 and older participated in the Americans Changing Lives longitudinal study. Participants showed decreasing BMI and increasing CHC and FD with time. Current smokers presented lower BMI at Wave I and showed a slower decrease in BMI over time than those who never smoked. Obesity was associated with more CHC and greater FD at Wave I but did not influence their changes. Elders who experienced a slower decrease in BMI showed a slower increase in CHC and FD; the change in health was not related to the change in BMI.

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