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Lam looks at population and development in next 15 years in UN commission keynote address

Mitchell et al. find harsh family environments may magnify disadvantage via impact on 'genetic architecture'

Frey says Arizona's political paradoxes explained in part by demography

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Raghunathan appointed director of Survey Research Center

PSC newsletter spring 2014 issue now available

Kusunoki wins faculty seed grant award from Institute for Research on Women and Gender

2014 PAA Annual Meeting, May 1-3, Boston

Next Brown Bag

Monday, April 21
Grant Miller: Managerial Incentives in Public Service Delivery

Accessibility Experiences and the Hindsight Bias: I Knew It All Along Versus It Could Never Have Happened

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Sanna, L.J., Norbert Schwarz, and E.M. Small. 2002. "Accessibility Experiences and the Hindsight Bias: I Knew It All Along Versus It Could Never Have Happened." Memory & Cognition, 30:1288-1296.

In two experiments, we tested accessibility experiences versus accessible content in influencing the hindsight bias when participants generated either thoughts about alternative outcomes or thoughts about known outcomes. Participants who had listed many thoughts (Experiment 1) and those who had contracted their brow muscles (Experiment 2) when considering alternate outcomes rated the known outcome as more likely than did than those who had listed two thoughts or who had not contracted their brows-a "backfire" effect. In contrast, but no less ironically, participants who had listed many thoughts and those who contracted their brows when considering known outcomes rated those outcomes as less likely-an "it could never have happened" effect. Both effects are due to subjective accessibility experiences, and their role in influencing and debiasing the hindsight bias is discussed.

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