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Substance Use Among Adults 35 Years of Age: Prevalence, Adulthood Predictors, and Impact of Adolescent Substance Use

Publication Abstract

Merline, A.C., Patrick M. O'Malley, John E. Schulenberg, Jerald Bachman, and Lloyd Johnston. 2004. "Substance Use Among Adults 35 Years of Age: Prevalence, Adulthood Predictors, and Impact of Adolescent Substance Use." American Journal of Public Health, 94:96-102.

Objectives. We examined the prevalence of substance use among American adults aged 35 years, and we considered adulthood predictors and the impact of adolescent substance use. Methods. National panel data were drawn from the Monitoring the Future study. Logistic regressions were conducted to assess the impact of demographics, life experiences, and adolescent substance use on smoking, heavy drinking, prescription drug misuse, marijuana use, and cocaine use at 35 years of age. Results. Factors related to increased likelihood of substance use include high school use, unemployment, and noncustodial parenthood. Lower use was associated with being female, a college graduate, a professional, married, or a custodial parent. Conclusions. Among those aged 35 years, substance use was still rather prevalent and was a function of adulthood roles, experiences, and previous use. (Am J Public Health. 2004;94:96-102).

PMCID: PMC1449833. (Pub Med Central)

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