Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Lam says tightening global labor market good for American workers

Johnston says e-cigs may reverse two-decades of progress on smoking reduction

Mueller-Smith finds incarceration increases the likelihood of committing more, and more serious, crimes

Highlights

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Jerald Bachman photo

Wishing to Work: New Perspectives on How Adolescents' Part-Time Work Intensity Is Linked to Educational Disengagement, Substance Use, and Other Problem Behaviours

Publication Abstract

Bachman, Jerald, D.J. Safron, S.R. Sy, and John E. Schulenberg. 2003. "Wishing to Work: New Perspectives on How Adolescents' Part-Time Work Intensity Is Linked to Educational Disengagement, Substance Use, and Other Problem Behaviours." International Journal of Behavioral Development, 27:301-315.

This study examines interrelations among students' educational engagement, desired and actual school-year employment, substance use, and other problem behaviours. Cross-sectional findings from representative samples of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students in the United States, totalling over 300,000 respondents surveyed during the years 1992-1998, include the following: Large majorities of adolescents wish to work part-time during the school year, although most in earlier grades are not actually employed. Those who desire to work long hours tend to have low grades and low college aspirations; they are also more likely than average to use cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. Students' preferences for part-time work emerge at younger ages (i.e., earlier grades) than actual work, and the preferences show equal or stronger correlations with educational disengagement and problem behaviours.

DOI:10.1080/01650250244000281 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next