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Axinn says data show incidents of sexual assault start at 'very young age'

Miech on 'generational forgetting' about drug-use dangers

Impacts of H-1B visas: Lower prices and higher production - or lower wages and higher profits?

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017, noon:
Daniel Almirall, "Getting SMART about adaptive interventions"

Workplace Accommodations for People With Disabilities: National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, 1994-1995

Publication Abstract

Zwerling, C., P.S. Whitten, N.L. Sprince, C.S. Davis, R.B. Wallace, P. Blanck, and Steven Heeringa. 2003. "Workplace Accommodations for People With Disabilities: National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, 1994-1995." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 45:517-525.

As American workers age, workers with impairments and functional limitations make up a larger percentage of our workforce. This investigation presents data from the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement 1994-1995 (NHIS-D) describing the nature of workplace accommodations in the American workforce and factors associated with the Provision of such accommodations. Of a nationally representative sample of workers aged 18 to 69 years with a wide range of impairments, 12% reported receiving workplace accommodations. Males (odds ratio (OR) 0.64: 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0. 78) and Southerners (OR 0.57; 95% CI = 0.47-0.70) were less likely than others to receive workplace accommodations. Those with mental health conditions were less likely than others to receive accommodations (OR 0.56; 95 % CI = 0.44 - 0.70). College graduates (OR 1.53; 95% CI = 1.22-1.91), older workers, full time workers (OR 3.99; 95 % CI = 2.63-3.87), and the self-employed (OR 1.76; 95 % CI = 1.28-2.41) were more likely than others to receive accommodations.

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