Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stern, Novak, Harlow, and colleagues say compensation due Californians forcibly sterilized under eugenics laws

Burgard and Seelye find job insecurity linked to psychological distress among workers in later years

Former PSC trainee Jay Borchert parlays past incarceration and doctoral degree into pursuing better treatment of inmates

More News

Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Use of Multiple Imputation to Correct for Nonresponse Bias in a Survey of Urologic Symptoms Among African-American Men

Publication Abstract

Taylor, J. M G, K.L. Cooper, J.T. Wei, A.V. Sarma, Trivellore Raghunathan, and Steven Heeringa. 2002. "Use of Multiple Imputation to Correct for Nonresponse Bias in a Survey of Urologic Symptoms Among African-American Men." American Journal of Epidemiology, 156:774-782.

The Flint Men's Health Study is an ongoing population-based study of African-American men designed to address questions related to prostate cancer and urologic symptoms. The initial phase of the study was conducted in 1996-1997 in two stages: an interviewer-administered survey followed by a clinical examination. The response rate in the clinical examination phase was 52%. Thus, some data were missing for clinical examination variables, diminishing the generalizability of the results to the general population. This paper is a case study demonstrating the application of multiple imputation to address important questions related to prostate cancer and urologic symptoms in a data set with missing values. On the basis of the observed clinical examination data, the American Urological Association Symptoms Score showed a surprising reduction in symptoms in the oldest age group, but after multiple imputation there was a monotonically increasing trend with age. It appeared that multiple imputation corrected for nonresponse bias associated with the observed data. For other outcome measures-namely, the age-adjusted 95th percentile of prostate-specific antigen level and the association between urologic symptoms and prostate volume-results from the observed data and the multiply imputed data were similar.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next