Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Mitchell finds children who lose fathers suffer at cellular level

Seefeldt says hard work alone won't allow poor to reach middle-class status in America

Shaefer says proposed plan to cover tax cuts would hurt a lot of struggling Americans

More News

Highlights

Neal Krause wins GSA's Robert Kleemeier Award

U-M awarded $58 million to develop ideas for preventing and treating health problems

Bailey, Eisenberg , and Fomby promoted at PSC

Former PSC trainee Eric Chyn wins PAA's Dorothy S. Thomas Award for best paper

More Highlights

Workforce Participation by Persons With Disabilities: the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, 1994 to 1995

Publication Abstract

Zwerling, C., P.S. Whitten, N.L. Sprince, C.S. Davis, R.B. Wallace, P.D. Blanck, and Steven Heeringa. 2002. "Workforce Participation by Persons With Disabilities: the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement, 1994 to 1995." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 44:358-364.

Using the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement of 1994 to 1995, we examined the factors associated with employment among Americans with disabilities. Persons with disabilities who were more educated were more likely to be working. Married men were more likely to work than unmarried men (odds ratio [OR], 1.58). Blacks were less likely to work than whites (OR 0.56). Persons with disabilities related to cardiovascular disease (OR, 0.23), musculoskeletal disease (OR, 0.37), and respiratory disease (OR, 0.23) were less likely to work than other Americans with disabilities. Among persons with psychiatric disorders, there was considerable variety in the propensity to work. Persons with schizophrenia (OP, 0.24) and paranoid delusional disorder (OR, 0.34) were markedly less likely to work; Persons with bipolar disorder (OR, 0.60) and major depression (OP, 0. 69) were also less likely to work. Lastly, persons with self-reported alcohol abuse (OP, 1.30) were more likely to work, and persons with self-reported drug abuse (OR, 0.93) were not less likely to work, than others in our study population of Americans with disabilities. (J Occup Environ Med. 2002;44:358-364)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next