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Cell Membrane Trans-Fatty Acids and the Risk of Primary Cardiac Arrest

Publication Abstract

Lemaitre, R.N., I.B. King, Trivellore Raghunathan, R.M. Pearce, S. Weinmann, R.H. Knopp, M.K. Copass, L.A. Cobb, and D.S. Siscovick. 2002. "Cell Membrane Trans-Fatty Acids and the Risk of Primary Cardiac Arrest." Circulation, 105:697-701.

Background-The relation of trans-fatty acid intake to life-threatening arrhythmias and primary cardiac arrest is unknown. Methods and Results-We investigated the association of trans-fatty acid intake, assessed through a biomarker, with the risk of primary cardiac arrest in a population-based case-control study. Cases, aged 25 to 74 years, were out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients attended by paramedics in Seattle, Washington from 1988 to 1999 (n=179). Controls, matched to cases by age and sex, were randomly identified from the community (n=285). Participants were free of previous clinically diagnosed heart disease. Blood was obtained at the time of cardiac arrest (cases) or at the time of an interview (controls) to assess trans-fatty acid intake. Higher total trans-fatty acids in red blood cell membranes was associated with a modest increase in the risk of primary cardiac arrest after adjustment for medical and lifestyle risk factors (odds ratio for interquintile range, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0 to 2.1). However, trans isomers of oleic acid were not associated with risk (odds ratio for interquintile range, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.2), whereas higher levels of trans isomers of linoleic acid were associated with 3-fold increase in risk (odds ratio for interquintile range, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.4). Conclusions-These findings suggest that dietary intake of total trans-fatty acids is associated with modest increase and trans isomers of linoleic acid with a larger increase in the risk of primary cardiac arrest. These associations need to be confirmed in future studies that distinguish between trans isomers of linoleic acid and trans isomers of oleic acid.

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