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Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

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Neighborhood deterioration, social skills, and social relationships in late life

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal. 2006. "Neighborhood deterioration, social skills, and social relationships in late life." International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 62(3): 185-207.

This study is designed to test two hypotheses. The first specifies that older adults who live in dilapidated neighborhoods will receive less social support and encounter more negative interaction with family and friends. The second hypothesis proposes that the relationship between deteriorated neighborhood conditions and social relationships will depend upon whether older study participants have strong social skills. Data from a recent nationwide survey of older adults suggest that living in run-down neighborhoods is associated with more negative interaction; however, residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods is not related to the amount of support older people receive from significant others. But perhaps more important, the findings further reveal that the effects of living in run-down neighborhoods on social support and negative interaction are completely offset for older individuals who possess strong social skills.

DOI:10.2190/7PVL-3YA2-A3QC-9M0B (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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