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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Income Inequality and Risk of Suicide in New York City Neighborhoods: a Multilevel Case-Control Study

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Miller, J.R., T.M. Piper, J. Ahern, M. Tracy, K.J. Tardiff, D. Vlahov, and Sandro Galea. 2005. "Income Inequality and Risk of Suicide in New York City Neighborhoods: a Multilevel Case-Control Study." Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 35(4): 448-459.

Evidence on the relationship between income inequality and suicide is inconsistent. Data from the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for all fatal injuries was collected to conduct a multilevel case-control study. In multilevel models, suicide decedents (n = 374) were more likely than accident controls (n = 45 3) to reside in neighborhoods with greater income inequality even after controlling for individual characteristics; this relation was modified by age with an effect overall and among decedents aged 15-34 but not among decedents 35-64. These data suggest that income inequality may contribute to the risk of suicide in younger adults.

Country of focus: United States of America.

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