Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Bound, Geronimus, et al. find estimates of decreasing longevity among low-SES whites sensitive to measures and interpretations

Thompson casts doubt on the rehabilitative intentions of prison labor

Inglehart says European social democracy is a victim of its own success

More News

Highlights

U-M participants at PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29

Heather Ann Thompson wins Bancroft Prize for History for 'Blood in the Water'

Michigan ranks in USN&WR top-10 grad schools for sociology, public health, labor economics, social policy, social psychology

Paula Lantz to speak at Women in Health Leadership Summit, March 24, 2:30-5:30 Michigan League

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Income Inequality and Risk of Suicide in New York City Neighborhoods: a Multilevel Case-Control Study

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Miller, J.R., T.M. Piper, J. Ahern, M. Tracy, K.J. Tardiff, D. Vlahov, and Sandro Galea. 2005. "Income Inequality and Risk of Suicide in New York City Neighborhoods: a Multilevel Case-Control Study." Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 35(4): 448-459.

Evidence on the relationship between income inequality and suicide is inconsistent. Data from the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for all fatal injuries was collected to conduct a multilevel case-control study. In multilevel models, suicide decedents (n = 374) were more likely than accident controls (n = 45 3) to reside in neighborhoods with greater income inequality even after controlling for individual characteristics; this relation was modified by age with an effect overall and among decedents aged 15-34 but not among decedents 35-64. These data suggest that income inequality may contribute to the risk of suicide in younger adults.

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next