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Daniel Eisenberg, "Healthy Minds Network: Mental Health among College-Age Populations"

Behavior Problems in New York City's Children After the September 11, 2001, Terrorist Attacks

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Stuber, J., B. Pfefferbaum, Sandro Galea, S. Vandivere, G. Fairbrother, and K. Moore. 2005. "Behavior Problems in New York City's Children After the September 11, 2001, Terrorist Attacks." American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 75(2): 190-200.

Children's behavior was assessed with 3 cross-sectional randoin-digit-dial telephone surveys conducted 11 months before, 4 months after, and 6 months after September 11, 2001. Parents reported fewer behavior problems in children 4 months after the attacks compared with the pre-September 11 baseline. However, 6 months after the attacks. parents' reporting of behavior problems was comparable to pre-September 11 levels. In the 1st few months after a disaster, the identification of children who need mental health treatment may be complicated by a dampened behavioral response or by a decreased sensitivity of parental assessment to behavioral problems.

DOI:10.1037/0002-9432.75.2.190 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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