Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

ISR's Scott Page says diverse teams produce optimal results

Bound, Geronimus, et al. find estimates of decreasing longevity among low-SES whites sensitive to measures and interpretations

Thompson casts doubt on the rehabilitative intentions of prison labor

More News

Highlights

Seefeldt discusses her book Abandoned Families, Wed, March 29, 4 PM, Annenberg Auditorium

U-M participants at PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29

Heather Ann Thompson wins Bancroft Prize for History for 'Blood in the Water'

Michigan ranks in USN&WR top-10 grad schools for sociology, public health, labor economics, social policy, social psychology

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

Drug and Alcohol Use as Determinants of New York City Homicide Trends From 1990 to 1998

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Tardiff, A.K., Z. Wallace, M. Tracy, T.M. Piper, D. Viahov, and Sandro Galea. 2005. "Drug and Alcohol Use as Determinants of New York City Homicide Trends From 1990 to 1998." Journal of Forensic Sciences, 50(2): 470-474.

n this population-level study, we analyzed how well changes in drug and alcohol use among homicide victims explained declining homicide rates in New York City between 1990 and 1998. Victim demographics, cause of death, and toxicology were obtained for all homicide (N = 12573) and accidental death victims (N = 6351) between 1990 and 1998 from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of New York (OCME). The proportion of homicide and accident decedents positive for cocaine fell between 1990 and 1998 (13% and 9% respectively); the proportion of homicide and accident decedents positive for opiates and/or alcohol did not change significantly. Changing patterns of drug and alcohol use by homicide victims were comparable to changing patterns of drug and alcohol use in accident victims, suggesting that changes in drug and alcohol use among homicide victims between 1990 and 1998 cannot solely explain the decline in NYC homicide rates.

DOI:10.1520/JFS2004287 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next