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Anxiety's Relationship to Inconsistent Use of Oral Contraceptives

Publication Abstract

Walsemann, Katrina M., and Anthony D. Perez. 2006. "Anxiety's Relationship to Inconsistent Use of Oral Contraceptives." Health Education and Behavior, 33(2): 197-214.

Five percent of typical oral contraceptive users experience an unintended pregnancy every year. Inconsistent use of oral contraception may be a leading contributor to the high rate of unintended pregnancy among oral contraceptive users. Previous medical research also suggests that anxiety may play a role in medication compliance, yet no known studies have examined the relationship between anxiety and oral contraceptive use. To test this relationship, the authors analyze data from the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle V (NSFG-V), restricting their sample to sexually active women currently taking oral contraceptives. They find that women who report multiple episodes of anxiety lasting at least 6 months have a greater probability of inconsistent use. The authors suggest goals for future research and discuss the role of health care professionals in addressing oral contraception compliance in light of their findings.

DOI:10.1177/1090198105277322 (Full Text)

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Country of focus: United States of America.

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