Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Lam looks at population and development in next 15 years in UN commission keynote address

Mitchell et al. find harsh family environments may magnify disadvantage via impact on 'genetic architecture'

Frey says Arizona's political paradoxes explained in part by demography

Highlights

PSC newsletter spring 2014 issue now available

Kusunoki wins faculty seed grant award from Institute for Research on Women and Gender

2014 PAA Annual Meeting, May 1-3, Boston

USN&WR ranks Michigan among best in nation for graduate education in sociology, public health, economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, April 21
Grant Miller: Managerial Incentives in Public Service Delivery

Arline T. Geronimus photo

"Weathering" and age-patterns of allostatic load scores among Blacks and Whites in the United States

Publication Abstract

Geronimus, Arline T., Margaret Hicken, Danya Keene, and John Bound. 2006. ""Weathering" and age-patterns of allostatic load scores among Blacks and Whites in the United States." American Journal of Public Health, 96: 826-833.

Objectives. We considered whether US Blacks experience early health deterioration, as measured across biological indicators (e.g., cardiovascular, metabolic, immune) of repeated exposure and adaptation to stressors.

Methods. Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, we examined allostatic load scores for adults aged 18-64 years. We estimated probability of a high score by age, race, gender, and poverty status and Blacks' odds of having a high score relative to Whites' odds.

Results. Blacks had higher scores than did Whites and had a greater probability of a high score at all ages, particularly at 35-64 years. Racial differences were not explained by poverty. Poor and nonpoor Black women had the highest and second highest probability of high allostatic load scores, respectively, and the highest excess scores compared with their male or White counterparts.

Conclusions. We found evidence that racial inequalities in health exist across a range of biological systems among adults and are not explained by racial differences in poverty. The weathering effects of living in a race-conscious society may be greatest among those Blacks most likely to engage in high-effort coping.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2004.060749 (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC1470581. (Pub Med Central)

Licensed Access Link

Country of focus: United States.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next