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Comparison of Web and Mail Surveys for Studying Secondary Consequences Associated with Substance Use: Evidence for Minimal Mode Effects

Publication Abstract

Couper, Mick P., S.E. McCabe, J.A. Cranford, and C.J. Boyd. 2006. "Comparison of Web and Mail Surveys for Studying Secondary Consequences Associated with Substance Use: Evidence for Minimal Mode Effects." Addictive Behaviors, 31(1): 162-168.

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined the impact of using a Web survey vs. a more traditional mail survey on the reporting of secondary consequences associated with substance use by undergraduate students. METHODS: During the spring of 2001, a survey questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected sample of 7000 undergraduate students attending a large Midwestern research university in the United States. Sampled students were randomly assigned to a Web survey mode (n = 3500) or a mail survey mode (n = 3500). RESULTS: The majority of respondents experienced a secondary consequence of substance use in the past 12 months. Bivariate and multivariate results showed minimal differences between Web and mail survey modes in the reporting of secondary consequences associated with substance use. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides evidence that Web surveys can be used as an effective mode for collecting data regarding secondary consequences among undergraduate college students. The present study suggests secondary consequences associated with substance use are highly prevalent among undergraduate students.

DOI:10.1016/j.addbeh.2005.04.018 (Full Text)

Country of focus: United States.

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