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Almirall says comparing SMART designs will increase treatment quality for children with autism

Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Alter says lack of access to administrative data is "big drag on research"


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

Reynolds Farley photo

Understanding Racial Differences and Trends: How SIPP Can Assist

Publication Abstract

Farley, Reynolds. 1985. "Understanding Racial Differences and Trends: How SIPP Can Assist." Journal of Economic and Social Measurement, 13(3-4): 245-61.

Throughout the post-World War 2 period, court decisions and laws have sought to provide black Americans with equal opportunities. Some people anticipated that racial differences in educational attainment, occupational achievement, income, and poverty would rapidly decline as a result of the civil rights revolution and the War on Poverty. While there has been substantial progress in some areas, racial differences on many indicators of social and economic status have remained large or even increased. A thorough analysis of data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation should provide useful information about (a) the persistence of racial differences in the earnings of ostensibly similar black and white workers; (b) poverty in the black community, especially the impact of govemmental transfer programs; (c) racial differences in geographic migration, especially with regard to changing economic opportunities; (d) racial differences in mortality, morbidity, and fertility; (e) the economic status of middle-class blacks and comparable whites.

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