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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

Reynolds Farley photo

Understanding Racial Differences and Trends: How SIPP Can Assist

Publication Abstract

Farley, Reynolds. 1985. "Understanding Racial Differences and Trends: How SIPP Can Assist." Journal of Economic and Social Measurement, 13(3-4): 245-61.

Throughout the post-World War 2 period, court decisions and laws have sought to provide black Americans with equal opportunities. Some people anticipated that racial differences in educational attainment, occupational achievement, income, and poverty would rapidly decline as a result of the civil rights revolution and the War on Poverty. While there has been substantial progress in some areas, racial differences on many indicators of social and economic status have remained large or even increased. A thorough analysis of data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation should provide useful information about (a) the persistence of racial differences in the earnings of ostensibly similar black and white workers; (b) poverty in the black community, especially the impact of govemmental transfer programs; (c) racial differences in geographic migration, especially with regard to changing economic opportunities; (d) racial differences in mortality, morbidity, and fertility; (e) the economic status of middle-class blacks and comparable whites.

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