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Surprising findings on what influences unintended pregnancy from Wise, Geronimus and Smock

Recommendations on how to reduce discrimination resulting from ban-the-box policies cite Starr's work

Brian Jacob on NAEP scores: "Michigan is the only state in the country where proficiency rates have actually declined over time."

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Call for papers: Conference on computational social science, April 2017, U-M

Sioban Harlow honored with 2017 Sarah Goddard Power Award for commitment to women's health

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

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Mon, March 13, 2017, noon:
Rachel Best

Rising out-of-pocket costs in disease management programs

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Chernew, Michael, A. B. Rosen, and A. M. Fendrick. 2006. "Rising out-of-pocket costs in disease management programs." American Journal of Managed Care, 12(3), 150-154.

objectives: To document the rise in copayments for patients in disease management programs and to call attention to the inherent conflicts that exist between these 2 approaches to benefit design.

Methods: Data from 2 large health plans were used to compare cost sharing in disease management programs with cost sharing outside of disease management programs.

Results: The copayments charged to participants in disease management programs usually do not differ substantially from those charged to other beneficiaries.

Conclusions: Cost sharing and disease management result in conflicting approaches to benefit design. Increasing copayments may lead to underuse of recommended services, thereby decreasing the clinical effectiveness and increasing the overall costs of disease management programs. Policyrnakers and private purchasers should consider the use of targeted benefit designs when implementing disease management programs or redesigning cost-sharing provisions. Current information systems and health services research are sufficiently advanced to permit these benefit designs.

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