Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Krause says having religious friends leads to gratitude, which is associated with better health

Work by Bailey and Dynarski on growing income gap in graduation rates cited in NYT

Johnston says marijuana use by college students highest in 30 years

Highlights

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Michigan's graduate sociology program tied for 4th with Stanford in USN&WR rankings

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Sep 22
Paula Fomby (Michigan), Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children's Aggressive Behavior at School Entry

The public role in higher education

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Courant, Paul, M. McPherson, and A.M. Resch. 2006. "The public role in higher education." National Tax Journal, 59(2), 291-318.

Most students attending colleges and universities, in the U.S. and the rest of the world, attend public institutions. This is a bit of a puzzle for economists, as it is clear that higher education provides private benefits to those who acquire it. This paper evaluates a number of arguments for publicly provided and publicly supported (via both nonprofit provision and direct support of Students) higher education. We find that the arguments for nonprofit provision, whether public or private, are powerful for most undergraduate education and for basic research. We suggest that there are strong equity reasons for public support of higher education for lower-income students, and that general public support may have good efficiency properties as well. We also show that the common system of tiers in public higher education, with flagship universities, regional campuses, and community colleges, is economically efficient under plausible assumptions.

Licensed Access Link

Public Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next