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Monday, Jan 12
Filiz Garip, Changing Dynamics of Mexico-U.S. Migration

Alcohol drinking problems among New York City residents after the September 11 terrorist attacks

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Vlahov, D., Sandro Galea, J. Ahern, S. Rudenstine, H. Resnick, D. Kilpatrick, and R.M. Crum. 2006. "Alcohol drinking problems among New York City residents after the September 11 terrorist attacks." Substance Use and Misuse, 41(9), 1295-1311.

Recent studies have shown an increase in alcohol use in New York City in the months after the September 11 terrorist attacks; thus far there have been no studies documenting changes in drinking problems. In 2002, a random digit dial phone survey was conducted of residents of New York City. This study provided us with estimates of the prevalence of alcohol drinking problems among residents of New York City 6 months after September 11 compared with the 6 months before September 11. Among 1,570 adults, the prevalence of drinking problems was 3.7% in the 6 months before September 11 and 4.2% in the 6 months after September 11. The incidence of drinking problems among those without drinking problems before September 11 was 2.2%. Persons with incident drinking problems were more likely than those without to report symptoms consistent with posttraumatic stress disorder (17.4% vs. 0.4% in those without drinking problems and 1.4% in nondrinkers), and depression (23.5% vs 5.6% vs. 4.9%, respectively) after September 11. After a disaster, a link between drinking problems and posttraumatic stress disorder or depression should be assessed.

DOI:10.1080/10826080600754900 (Full Text)

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